Well Hello There, Eli Horowitz Profile in Buzzfeed!

We’ve known that Eli Horowitz is some kind of storytelling genius for a while now—as Miranda July says, “Everyone who knows him thinks of him as their secret weapon”—but we’re glad the secret is finally out (we’ve been trying to tell people for years!) thanks to this terrific profile in Buzzfeed by Anne Helen Petersen.The piece perfectly captures much of what makes us so happy and proud to publish Eli. As Petersen writes, “It sounds hyperbolic, but it’s true: He’s radically rethinking the boundaries of narrative and our expectations for the technology that surrounds us.

Yes, we can confirm: True.

Over the course of the profile, Horowitz opens up to Petersen about his days at McSweeney’s, about the surprise benefits of his carpentry skills and the shortcomings of his homemade dumbwaiter, about the specialness of Sonoma County’s newest socialist restaurant, Russia House Number #1, and about his new book, The Pickle Index, which, she notes, “aims to effectively reconceptualize the book—in its digital and printed forms alike.”

The printed book! That’s where we come in!

We heartily recommend the whole piece to you, not least for the animated GIF of the aforementioned dumbwaiter.

Here they dive into The Pickle Index:

Horowitz applied the same philosophy to his newest work, The Pickle Index, which tells the story of a delightfully unskilled circus troupe against the backdrop of a fascist dystopia, united by a forced devotion to fermented items. “There are all these different ways that you can read that are valid, so I wanted to fully imagine all of those formats. So: the book-iest book I could do, and the app-iest app. Even the paperback, and the Kindle version. They’ll have their own sort of thing, with different reaches and different audiences.” For the hardback version of The Pickle Index, you go back and forth, chapter to chapter, between two beautifully illustrated volumes, each around 100 pages. For the paperback, those chapters are integrated, this time with accompanying woodcut illustrations. And then there’s the app, which releases sections of the narrative over the course of 10 days.

And one final tidbit that’s also not worth keeping secret: “The Silent History, a paperback from 2012, is slated to become AMC’s new prestige drama.” (!!!)

Anyway, just go read the whole piece already.

 

Posted 11/09/15 Posted November 9, 2015